Nanomaterials and isotope researchers awarded $3.3 million

UBC campus

Two teams of UBC researchers received $1.65 million each from NSERC. Photo: UBC

Researchers studying nanomaterials and isotopes at the University of British Columbia received a $3.3 million boost in funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

Mark MacLachlan

Two UBC teams, led respectively by Chemistry Prof. Mark MacLachlan and Physics Prof. Reiner Kruecken, received $1.65 million each from NSERC’s Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) grants. The funding extends over a six-year period. The investment will help MacLachlan and Kruecken mentor and train graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

“The CREATE grants allow for our young researchers to develop professional and technical skills as they work to advance the knowledge in their fields,” said John Hepburn, UBC vice president, research and international. “NSERC’s support is invaluable in preparing them for their future careers.”

physics 150

UBC’s CREATE grants are two of nine programs to receive funding totalling $14.8 million, announced today by Ed Holder, Minister of State for Science and Technology, in Montreal.

“Through the CREATE program, our government is encouraging university-industry partnerships to ensure science and engineering graduates receive hands-on training in manufacturing, environmental science, natural resources and energy, information, and communications technologies,” Holder said. “As a result, graduates will be better prepared to hit the ground running in exciting, innovative industries.”

To learn more about CREATE grants, click here

Background

UBC’s CREATE grants:

Mark MacLachlan, Professor, UBC Department of Chemistry
NanoMAT: NSERC CREATE Training Program in Nanomaterials Science & Technology

Nanomaterials have dimensions about 1/1000th the width of a human hair. Though invisible to our eyes, these materials are already used for diagnosing and treating diseases, environmental remediation, developing solar cells and batteries, as well as other applications. Nanomaterials form a multi-billion dollar industry that is expanding rapidly. To address the growing need for highly qualified trainees in Canada, UBC researchers have spearheaded the NanoMat program. Through a unique interdisciplinary training program, science and engineering students will undertake innovative research projects, receive hands-on training, and undertake internships at companies in Canada and across the world.

Reiner Kruecken, Professor, UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy
ISOSIM, ISOtopes for Science and Medicine

The ISOSIM program is designed to provide students with enriched training experiences in the production and preparation of nuclear isotopes for innovative applications that range from medical research and environmental science to investigations of the foundations of the universe. This will prepare students for positions in a number of Canadian industrial sectors including medical diagnostics and treatment, pharmaceutical sciences, development of next-generation electronic devices, environmental sciences, and isotope production. This project builds on the existing cooperation between UBC and TRIUMF, Canada’s national laboratory for particle and nuclear phsyics, on isotopes science.

Contact

Corey Allen
UBC Public Affairs
Tel: 604.822.2644
Cell: 604.209.3048
Email: corey.allen@ubc.ca
@coreyallenubc